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What makes mental illness stigma so hard to change (and also to study)?

by Ava T. Casados about her recently published article in Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice Society holds negative attitudes about mental illness, and these attitudes form a stigma that impacts many individuals on both interpersonal levels (e.g., blaming, name-calling) and institutional levels (e.g., employment discrimination). The stigma experienced because of one’s mental illness can in turn exacerbate psychological symptoms and …

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Medication, Behavioral Therapy, or Both? Examining Understudied Domains for Children with ADHD

by Brittany M. Merrill, MS, Amy R. Altszuler, MS, & William E. Pelham, PhD Children with ADHD experience problems in daily life functioning in school, with their family, and with peers. Rather than focusing on symptoms of ADHD, treatment providers should focus on these impairments in daily life functioning when making recommendations, as these problems are the reason parents and teachers …

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Can You Change Your Personality Traits?

by Brent W. Roberts, PhD Can you change your personality traits? We know from hundreds of observational studies that personality traits can and do change. The fact that personality traits are not “set in plaster” naturally leads to the question of volitional change—if someone or some institution sets about to change personality, can it be done? This question had long …

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Behavioral Activation for Depression During Pregnancy: Results from a multi-site pragmatic randomized controlled effectiveness trial.

Behavioral Activation for Depression During Pregnancy: Results from a multi-site pragmatic randomized controlled effectiveness trial – an SCP blog piece by Drs. Hubley and Dimidjian For many, being pregnant is one of the most important and enjoyable moments in life.  For others, life changes during pregnancy can become major challenges and 1 in 7 pregnant women become clinically depressed (Gavin …

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Is “Abnormal Psychology” Really all that Abnormal?

Is “Abnormal Psychology” Really all that Abnormal – a blog post by Jonathan D. Schaefer, a doctoral student of Clinical Psychology at Duke University An assumption held by many—including many mental health professionals—is that people who suffer from one or more mental disorders constitute a small, troubled minority. This assumption is reflected in both the way we talk about mental …

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Do Beliefs about Biology Matter for Mental Health?

Do Beliefs About Biology Matter for Mental Health? by Kate MacDuffie and Tim Strauman about their newly published article in Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice Imagine that you have just visited a mental health professional and received a diagnosis of depression.  You have just been given a name for the distressing emotional state which, prior to your appointment, felt confusing and unpredictable.  The …

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What can science tell us about suicide? (Answer: Not nearly enough… yet.)

By Joseph Franklin, PhD and Jessica Ribeiro, PhD Suicide. For most people, this word conjures up images of someone who is extremely sad. Someone so lonely, stressed, or defeated that they’ve decided that they’d be better off dead. Some clinicians might add to this picture related characteristics such as emotion dysregulation, substance abuse, or impulsivity. Some researchers may include a …

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Use of Universal Screening Scores to Predict Distal Academic and Behavioral Outcomes Among School-Aged youth

Dr. Katie Eklund discusses the use of universal screening scores to predict distal academic and behavioral outcomes among school-aged youth. Research has well-documented poor school-related outcomes for students with behavioral and emotional concerns, including lower academic achievement, higher rates of suspension/expulsion, increased absenteeism, and lower graduation rates (e.g., Lane, Carter, Pierson, & Glaeser, 2006). As up to 20% of school-aged …