Live Webinar Schedule

Welcome to the Live Webinars of Division 12. Thank you for your support!
If you have questions, please email the Central Office at division12apa@gmail.com.

March 6, 2019 12-1 PM ET
Community Engagement: Perspectives from Community-Partnered Research and Applications to Clinical Practice

Presenter: Renee Pepin, PhD is a Research Scientist at the Dartmouth Centers for Health and Aging.  She was trained in clinical geropsychology and is interested in expanding access to mental health services for older adults in community-based settings. Her research consists of the implementation and dissemination of evidence-based depression treatments for older adults using innovative, brief, and practical approaches to delivery through a combination of community-based aging service providers and technology. She expanded beyond geriatric mental health services to other areas including the implementation of evidence-based community-delivered programs for reducing the risk of falls and the integration of best practices for geriatric care into routine primary care.

Webinar Summary: Community-based participatory research or community-partnered research is an approach to engage under-served, under resourced, and otherwise vulnerable populations (Chung, Jones, Dixon, Miranda, & Wells, 2010; De las Nueces, Hacker, DiGirolamo, & Hicks, 2012; Wells & Jones, 2009). In this presentation I will describe how, and why, we have used a community-partnered research approach for the integration of depression identification and intervention into Home Delivered Meal services. One innovation involves tailoring the program to fit within existing Meals on Wheels services: the intervention is framed within concerns that are relevant to the organization (i.e., social isolation) and screening is embedded into routine Meals on Wheels services.

Evidence of high rates of depression, social isolation and loneliness in homebound older adults including community samples (Bruce & McNamara, 1992), home and community- based services recipients (Pepin, Leggett, Sonnega, & Assari, in press), home delivered meals clients (Sirey et al., 2008). Prior strategies to meet the psychosocial needs of homebound older adults have taken advantage of existing services for this population, building on the access by partnering with home health care, homebased services such as home health care and home delivered meals (Bruce et al., 2015; Choi et al., 2014; Sirey et al., 2013). The challenges faced by homebound older adults are further exacerbated in rural areas because distances are greater, transportation options are fewer, and serious workforce shortages more acute (Chung et al., 2010; De las Nueces et al., 2012; Wells & Jones, 2009). Our group found using national data that depressive symptoms were associated with use of home and community-based services, above and beyond sociodemographic and health risk factors.(Pepin et al., in press) We are conducting an ongoing randomized controlled trial evaluating the acceptability, feasibility and comparative effectiveness of delivering two interventions by video-conferencing technology to promote social connectedness among homebound older adults receiving home-delivered meals: 1. Behavioral activation (tele-BA) vs. 2. Friendly visitors (tele-FV). To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial to leverage local Meals on Wheels (MoWs) agencies to engage homebound, socially isolated older adults in a telehealth intervention for social isolation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe community engagement
  • Identify opportunities for building community partnerships
  • Identify strategies for building community partnerships

CE Credits Available: 1

Pricing: $15 for Members / $50 for Non-Members
Members must be signed in for discount.

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Please Note: After purchasing, you must follow the registration link provided in your purchased webinar details to REGISTER for the webinar. It is a 2-step process. All purchased webinars are listed HERE.

March 14, 2019 12-1 PM ET
Psychological Approaches to the Assessment and Treatment of Chronic Pain
Presenter: Dr. John D. Otis is a Research Associate Professor at Boston University and the Director of Behavioral Medicine at the Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders (CARD). He is also a clinical psychologist in the Spinal Cord Injury Service at the VA Boston Healthcare System, West Roxbury, MA.  He received his graduate training in Health Psychology at the University of Florida Shands Hospital, specializing in the assessment and treatment of chronic pain. For the past 20 years Dr. Otis has conducted research and produced scholarly writing about pain throughout the lifespan. Dr. Otis has focused his clinical research career on the development of innovative approaches to pain management, tailored to specialized patient populations. His most recent research focuses on the develop of an intensive integrated treatment for Veterans who experience variety of chronic pain conditions complicated by mild traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury (SCI), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Dr. Otis is a clinician and researcher who has helped countless numbers of individuals gain greater control over their chronic pain. He travels nationally giving talks and workshops to both clinicians and patients on how the principles of CBT can be used to help people lead healthier and more productive lives. He is the author of Managing Chronic Pain (Oxford University Press: Treatments that Work Series) - an evidence-based treatment program that includes both a therapist manual and patient workbook. Webinar Summary: Chronic pain is one of the most frequent reasons that patients seek medical care in the United States, with approximately 55% of individuals reporting some pain, and 11.2% to 15.6% reporting chronic pain (Nahin, 2017). Estimates of costs of pain in the United States range from $560 to $635 billion per year when considering annual healthcare costs and costs associated with lower productivity (Gaskin & Richard, 2012). The recent "opioid epidemic" has further reinforced the need to develop and disseminate non-pharmacological pain management approaches to those who need them most. Cognitive behavioral treatments are considered the "frontline" psychological treatment for chronic pain; CBT has been shown through numerous trials to be efficacious at reducing pain related symptoms, distress and disability. CBT for chronic pain focuses on teaching patients ways to identify and change negative thoughts, feelings, and behaviors and to replace them with more adaptive pain coping strategies, with the ultimate goal being to improve quality of life, reduce pain-related interference, and decrease psychological distress. The presenter will review important factors that clinicians should consider when working with patients who have chronic pain including the selection of pain assessment measures, and ways to teach key cognitive-behavioral therapy skills that are commonly used.

CE Credits Available: 1

Pricing: $15 for Members / $50 for Non-Members
Members must be signed in for discount.

Purchase Live Webinar HERE

Please Note: After purchasing, you must follow the registration link provided in your purchased webinar details to REGISTER for the webinar. It is a 2-step process. All purchased webinars are listed HERE.

April 18, 2019 12-1 PM ET
Unified Protocol for the Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders

Presenter: Shannon Sauer-Zavala is the Director of Education and Training for the Unified Protocol Institute. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the University of Kentucky and completed her internship at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Sauer-Zavala is currently a faculty in BU's Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and divides her time between her research, clinical work, and dissemination efforts. Dr. Sauer-Zavala enjoys training others in research-supported psychological treatments.

Webinar Summary: The proliferation of specific treatment manuals for specific disorders has created unintended barriers for the implementation and dissemination of evidence-based psychological treatments. The Unified Protocol for the Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP; Barlow et al., 2018) is a transdiagnostic, emotion-focused cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) that targets core deficits occurring across the neurotic spectrum (e.g., anxiety, depressive, and related disorders). This webinar will review evidence supporting the development of such transdiagnostic interventions and provide a description of the core components of UP treatment modules, along with the similarities and differences between the UP and traditional CBT. The Unified Protocol is published as part of Oxford University Press’ Treatment’s That Work series, which highlights approaches with considerable empirical support (e.g., Ellard et al., 2010; Farchione et al., 2012). The Unified Protocol is based on decades of research on emotion science (Brown & Barlow, 2009; Campbell-Sills et al., 2006; Clark, Watson, & Mineka, 1994; Eaton, Krueger, & Oltmanns, 2011; Kessler et al., 2011; Rosellini et al., 2010; Watson, Clark, & Carey, 1988).

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to discuss the rationale for transdiagnostic psychological treatment
  • Participants will be able to develop a unified, transdiagnostic case conceptualization for patients presenting with comorbid emotional disorders.
  • Participants will be able to apply emotion-focused treatment concepts and strategies (e.g., objective monitoring, emotional awareness training, cognitive reappraisal, reduction of emotional avoidance and maladaptive emotion driven behaviors) to patients presenting with comorbid emotional disorders.

CE Credits Available: 1

Pricing: $15 for Members / $50 for Non-Members
Members must be signed in for discount.

Purchase Live Webinar HERE

Please Note: After purchasing, you must follow the registration link provided in your purchased webinar details to REGISTER for the webinar. It is a 2-step process. All purchased webinars are listed HERE.

May 7, 2019 12-1 PM ET
Strategies for integrating mHealth into clinical practice
Presenter: Stephen Schueller, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Psychological Science at the University of California, Irvine and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine. He received his bachelor’s in psychology at the University of California, Riverside and his doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco in the Department of Psychiatry. His work focuses on making mental health services more accessible and available through technology. This includes the development, deployment, evaluation, and implementation of mHealth resources. He has focused mostly on common mental health issues like depression and anxiety but with a strong interest in reaching underserved and marginalized populations. He also leads PsyberGuide.org, a project of One Mind that aims to empower people to make informed and responsible decisions regarding mHealth products for mental health. Webinar Summary: A robust body of research has demonstrated that mHealth interventions can lead to significant improvements in mental health. These findings have driven enthusiasm in the development of more and more mHealth tools. Current estimates suggest that over 10,000 mental health apps are commercially available (Neary & Schueller, 2018). Furthermore, many clinicians report an interest in using mHealth tools in their practice but few are doing so (Schueller, Washburn, & Price, 2016). However, although research in mHealth applications is robust, clinical knowledge of such applications, and how to use such applications in clinical practice is lacking. The availability and use of mHealth tools are rarely emphasized in clinical training programs. The presenter has discussed these issues in webinars and workshop presentations for ABCT, ADAA, and SAMHSA. Topics included will address ethical and legal considerations (Edwards-Stewart, Alexander, Armstrong, Hoyt, & O’Donohue, 2018), security and privacy concerns (O’Loughlin, Neary, Adkins, & Schueller, 2018), and best practices regarding the integration of apps into clinical care (Armstrong, Ciulla, Edwards-Stewart, Hoyt, & Bush, 2018). Learning Objectives:
  • Examine some resources to help navigate app marketplaces and discuss how to identify appropriate mental health apps
  • Review how to introduce apps to clients
  • Discuss integration of apps into current clinical practices

CE Credits Available: 1

Pricing: $15 for Members / $50 for Non-Members
Members must be signed in for discount.

Purchase Live Webinar HERE

Please Note: After purchasing, you must follow the registration link provided in your purchased webinar details to REGISTER for the webinar. It is a 2-step process. All purchased webinars are listed HERE.

To Be Rescheduled
Primary Care Behavioral Health Integration, A Case Example: Alcohol as a Vital Sign

Panelists:  Drs. Andrew Bertagnolli, Thekla Ross and Stacey Sterling

Overview: The content of this webinar was derived from a published review of studies focusing on behavioral health integration in primary care and a large-scale alcohol screening and brief intervention study at Kaiser Permanente Northern California. This webinar will describe the pillars and pearls of primary care behavioral health integration as well as implementation strategies to effectively embed an evidence-based practice like alcohol screening and intervention in primary care.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the primary care behavioral health model
  2. Summarize the pillars and pearls of behavioral health integration
  3. Provide evidenced based background for alcohol screening and intervention in primary care
  4. Describe real world implementation tips and tools from published Alcohol as a Vital Sign study

CE Credits Available: 1

To Be Rescheduled
Memory Processes, Therapy, and You: Transdiagnostic Perspectives on Maximizing Therapeutic Learning

Presenter:  Michael W. Otto, Ph.D. is Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Senior Fellow in the Institute for Health System Innovation and Policy Director at Boston University. He has had a major career focus on developing and validating new psychosocial treatments, with a focus on treatment refractory populations including those with bipolar, anxiety, and substance use disorders. His work includes a translational research agenda investigating brain-behavior relationships in therapeutic learning, including the use of novel strategies (e.g., d-cycloserine, yohimbine) to improve the consolidation of therapeutic learning. Dr. Otto’s focus on hard-to-treat conditions and principles underlying behavior-change failures led him to an additional focus on health-behavior promotion, including investigations of addictive behaviors, medication adherence, sleep, and exercise. Across these behaviors, he has been concerned with cognitive, attention, and affective factors that derail adaptive behaviors. Dr. Otto has published over 400 articles and over 20 books spanning his research interests, and he was identified as a “top producer” in the clinical empirical literature as well as an ISI Highly Cited Researcher. His leadership positions include serving as Past President of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, and immediate Past President of Division 12 of the American Psychological Association.

Overview: The way in which new learning is integrated into existing memory structures has rich clinical relevance because, regardless of theoretical orientation, psychotherapy is concerned with modification of the influence of an individual’s personal history on his or her current functioning. In short, frequently a goal of therapy is to modify the degree to which individuals are emotionally or behaviorally shackled by their own learning histories.  Accordingly, this talk provides a clinically-rich perspective on the nature of memory adaptation and accommodation in relation to therapeutic interventions, with the goal of enhancing clinical attention to helping patients better retain and use the valuable moments of change in psychotherapy.  Elements of this presentation will include an update on pharmacologic and behavioral strategies for enhancing extinction learning from exposure, as well as focused reminders to task other memory enhancing strategies—e.g., cues, exercise, sleep—for enhancing learning in therapy.

Learning Objectives:

  • Know concepts associated with memory reconsolidation.
  • Know the strength and reliability of post-reconsolidation extinction effects in human de novo fear conditioning studies.
  • Be aware of common strategies for enhancing memory for session material, including the influence of sleep and exercise.
  • Be able to select and apply strategies to enhance therapeutic learning in psychotherapy.

CE Credits Available: 1