Community Engagement: Perspectives from Community-Partnered Research and Applications to Clinical Practice

$10.00

Presenter: Renee Pepin, PhD is a Research Scientist at the Dartmouth Centers for Health and Aging.  She was trained in clinical geropsychology and is interested in expanding access to mental health services for older adults in community-based settings. Her research consists of the implementation and dissemination of evidence-based depression treatments for older adults using innovative, brief, and practical approaches to delivery through a combination of community-based aging service providers and technology. She expanded beyond geriatric mental health services to other areas including the implementation of evidence-based community-delivered programs for reducing the risk of falls and the integration of best practices for geriatric care into routine primary care.

 

Webinar Summary: Community-based participatory research or community-partnered research is an approach to engage under-served, under resourced, and otherwise vulnerable populations (Chung, Jones, Dixon, Miranda, & Wells, 2010; De las Nueces, Hacker, DiGirolamo, & Hicks, 2012; Wells & Jones, 2009). In this presentation I will describe how, and why, we have used a community-partnered research approach for the integration of depression identification and intervention into Home Delivered Meal services. One innovation involves tailoring the program to fit within existing Meals on Wheels services: the intervention is framed within concerns that are relevant to the organization (i.e., social isolation) and screening is embedded into routine Meals on Wheels services.

 

Evidence of high rates of depression, social isolation and loneliness in homebound older adults including community samples (Bruce & McNamara, 1992), home and community- based services recipients (Pepin, Leggett, Sonnega, & Assari, in press), home delivered meals clients (Sirey et al., 2008). Prior strategies to meet the psychosocial needs of homebound older adults have taken advantage of existing services for this population, building on the access by partnering with home health care, homebased services such as home health care and home delivered meals (Bruce et al., 2015; Choi et al., 2014; Sirey et al., 2013). The challenges faced by homebound older adults are further exacerbated in rural areas because distances are greater, transportation options are fewer, and serious workforce shortages more acute (Chung et al., 2010; De las Nueces et al., 2012; Wells & Jones, 2009). Our group found using national data that depressive symptoms were associated with use of home and community-based services, above and beyond sociodemographic and health risk factors.(Pepin et al., in press) We are conducting an ongoing randomized controlled trial evaluating the acceptability, feasibility and comparative effectiveness of delivering two interventions by video-conferencing technology to promote social connectedness among homebound older adults receiving home-delivered meals: 1. Behavioral activation (tele-BA) vs. 2. Friendly visitors (tele-FV). To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial to leverage local Meals on Wheels (MoWs) agencies to engage homebound, socially isolated older adults in a telehealth intervention for social isolation.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe community engagement
  • Identify opportunities for building community partnerships
  • Identify strategies for building community partnerships

Description

Presenter: Renee Pepin, PhD is a Research Scientist at the Dartmouth Centers for Health and Aging.  She was trained in clinical geropsychology and is interested in expanding access to mental health services for older adults in community-based settings. Her research consists of the implementation and dissemination of evidence-based depression treatments for older adults using innovative, brief, and practical approaches to delivery through a combination of community-based aging service providers and technology. She expanded beyond geriatric mental health services to other areas including the implementation of evidence-based community-delivered programs for reducing the risk of falls and the integration of best practices for geriatric care into routine primary care.

 

Webinar Summary: Community-based participatory research or community-partnered research is an approach to engage under-served, under resourced, and otherwise vulnerable populations (Chung, Jones, Dixon, Miranda, & Wells, 2010; De las Nueces, Hacker, DiGirolamo, & Hicks, 2012; Wells & Jones, 2009). In this presentation I will describe how, and why, we have used a community-partnered research approach for the integration of depression identification and intervention into Home Delivered Meal services. One innovation involves tailoring the program to fit within existing Meals on Wheels services: the intervention is framed within concerns that are relevant to the organization (i.e., social isolation) and screening is embedded into routine Meals on Wheels services.

 

Evidence of high rates of depression, social isolation and loneliness in homebound older adults including community samples (Bruce & McNamara, 1992), home and community- based services recipients (Pepin, Leggett, Sonnega, & Assari, in press), home delivered meals clients (Sirey et al., 2008). Prior strategies to meet the psychosocial needs of homebound older adults have taken advantage of existing services for this population, building on the access by partnering with home health care, homebased services such as home health care and home delivered meals (Bruce et al., 2015; Choi et al., 2014; Sirey et al., 2013). The challenges faced by homebound older adults are further exacerbated in rural areas because distances are greater, transportation options are fewer, and serious workforce shortages more acute (Chung et al., 2010; De las Nueces et al., 2012; Wells & Jones, 2009). Our group found using national data that depressive symptoms were associated with use of home and community-based services, above and beyond sociodemographic and health risk factors.(Pepin et al., in press) We are conducting an ongoing randomized controlled trial evaluating the acceptability, feasibility and comparative effectiveness of delivering two interventions by video-conferencing technology to promote social connectedness among homebound older adults receiving home-delivered meals: 1. Behavioral activation (tele-BA) vs. 2. Friendly visitors (tele-FV). To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial to leverage local Meals on Wheels (MoWs) agencies to engage homebound, socially isolated older adults in a telehealth intervention for social isolation.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe community engagement
  • Identify opportunities for building community partnerships
  • Identify strategies for building community partnerships