Strategies for integrating mHealth into clinical practice

$10.00

Presenter: Stephen Schueller, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Psychological Science at the University of California, Irvine and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine. He received his bachelor’s in psychology at the University of California, Riverside and his doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco in the Department of Psychiatry. His work focuses on making mental health services more accessible and available through technology. This includes the development, deployment, evaluation, and implementation of mHealth resources. He has focused mostly on common mental health issues like depression and anxiety but with a strong interest in reaching underserved and marginalized populations. He also leads PsyberGuide.org, a project of One Mind that aims to empower people to make informed and responsible decisions regarding mHealth products for mental health.

Webinar Summary: A robust body of research has demonstrated that mHealth interventions can lead to significant improvements in mental health. These findings have driven enthusiasm in the development of more and more mHealth tools. Current estimates suggest that over 10,000 mental health apps are commercially available (Neary & Schueller, 2018). Furthermore, many clinicians report an interest in using mHealth tools in their practice but few are doing so (Schueller, Washburn, & Price, 2016). However, although research in mHealth applications is robust, clinical knowledge of such applications, and how to use such applications in clinical practice is lacking. The availability and use of mHealth tools are rarely emphasized in clinical training programs. The presenter has discussed these issues in webinars and workshop presentations for ABCT, ADAA, and SAMHSA. Topics included will address ethical and legal considerations (Edwards-Stewart, Alexander, Armstrong, Hoyt, & O’Donohue, 2018), security and privacy concerns (O’Loughlin, Neary, Adkins, & Schueller, 2018), and best practices regarding the integration of apps into clinical care (Armstrong, Ciulla, Edwards-Stewart, Hoyt, & Bush, 2018).

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine some resources to help navigate app marketplaces and discuss how to identify appropriate mental health apps
  • Review how to introduce apps to clients
  • Discuss integration of apps into current clinical practices

Description

Presenter: Stephen Schueller, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Psychological Science at the University of California, Irvine and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine. He received his bachelor’s in psychology at the University of California, Riverside and his doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco in the Department of Psychiatry. His work focuses on making mental health services more accessible and available through technology. This includes the development, deployment, evaluation, and implementation of mHealth resources. He has focused mostly on common mental health issues like depression and anxiety but with a strong interest in reaching underserved and marginalized populations. He also leads PsyberGuide.org, a project of One Mind that aims to empower people to make informed and responsible decisions regarding mHealth products for mental health.

Webinar Summary: A robust body of research has demonstrated that mHealth interventions can lead to significant improvements in mental health. These findings have driven enthusiasm in the development of more and more mHealth tools. Current estimates suggest that over 10,000 mental health apps are commercially available (Neary & Schueller, 2018). Furthermore, many clinicians report an interest in using mHealth tools in their practice but few are doing so (Schueller, Washburn, & Price, 2016). However, although research in mHealth applications is robust, clinical knowledge of such applications, and how to use such applications in clinical practice is lacking. The availability and use of mHealth tools are rarely emphasized in clinical training programs. The presenter has discussed these issues in webinars and workshop presentations for ABCT, ADAA, and SAMHSA. Topics included will address ethical and legal considerations (Edwards-Stewart, Alexander, Armstrong, Hoyt, & O’Donohue, 2018), security and privacy concerns (O’Loughlin, Neary, Adkins, & Schueller, 2018), and best practices regarding the integration of apps into clinical care (Armstrong, Ciulla, Edwards-Stewart, Hoyt, & Bush, 2018).

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine some resources to help navigate app marketplaces and discuss how to identify appropriate mental health apps
  • Review how to introduce apps to clients
  • Discuss integration of apps into current clinical practices