Technology in Psychology: Understanding Threats And Preventing Unintended Consequences (with CE)

$40.00

Presenter: Samuel Lustgarten, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral psychologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s University Health Services/Mental Health Service. Over the last four years, he has been providing privacy and confidentiality consultations for private practices and university counseling centers. Samuel has concentrated on various technologies psychologists already use such as telemental health therapy, digital assessments, electronic medical records, email, and text messaging. His research has focused on the intersections between technology and psychology, and its effects on psychologists’ ethical considerations and decision-making processes. Samuel’s scholarly work has been published in American Psychologist, Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, and Professional Psychology: Research and Practice.

Overview: Psychotherapy is a treatment method and a healing relationship fit to the individual patient; however, only in the past two decades has sufficient research been conducted to operationalize these noble intentions into robust matching guidelines. This webinar will review the meta-analytic research and clinical practices compiled by an interdivisional APA task force on 7 effective means of adapting psychotherapy to patient transdiagnostic features. In this way, practice and research converge in responsiveness that demonstrably improves treatment outcomes.

Webinar Summary: Psychologists are increasingly using technology-based services for the provision of psychotherapy, assessment, research, and supervision of supervision. Online self-help therapies, smartphone applications, virtual reality, and social networking were all endorsed by psychologists surveyed in a “Delphi poll” (Norcross, Pfund, & Prochaska, 2013). As providers implement technology with their patients, examinees, participants, and supervisees, threats to various ethical standards exist (Lustgarten & Elhai, 2018). For instance, when technology is utilized, third-party platforms have independent privacy policies and terms of service, which can affect the privacy and confidentiality that can be maintained on behalf of a client (Lustgarten, 2015). Additionally, various actors can interfere with the secure transmission and use of technology-based services (e.g, governmental or organizational actors; Lustgarten & Colbow, 2017). This presentation will provide attendees with information about what services are currently used by professionals, how threat actors might take advantage of vulnerability, and how to better protect data.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will understand what technology is currently used in the provision of therapy and research.
  • Attendees will develop competence for threats to technology use.
  • Attendees will learn to employ strategies to protect clients and participants.
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Description

Presenter: Samuel Lustgarten, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral psychologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s University Health Services/Mental Health Service. Over the last four years, he has been providing privacy and confidentiality consultations for private practices and university counseling centers. Samuel has concentrated on various technologies psychologists already use such as telemental health therapy, digital assessments, electronic medical records, email, and text messaging. His research has focused on the intersections between technology and psychology, and its effects on psychologists’ ethical considerations and decision-making processes. Samuel’s scholarly work has been published in American Psychologist, Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, and Professional Psychology: Research and Practice.

 

Overview: Psychotherapy is a treatment method and a healing relationship fit to the individual patient; however, only in the past two decades has sufficient research been conducted to operationalize these noble intentions into robust matching guidelines. This webinar will review the meta-analytic research and clinical practices compiled by an interdivisional APA task force on 7 effective means of adapting psychotherapy to patient transdiagnostic features. In this way, practice and research converge in responsiveness that demonstrably improves treatment outcomes.

 

Webinar Summary: Psychologists are increasingly using technology-based services for the provision of psychotherapy, assessment, research, and supervision of supervision. Online self-help therapies, smartphone applications, virtual reality, and social networking were all endorsed by psychologists surveyed in a “Delphi poll” (Norcross, Pfund, & Prochaska, 2013). As providers implement technology with their patients, examinees, participants, and supervisees, threats to various ethical standards exist (Lustgarten & Elhai, 2018). For instance, when technology is utilized, third-party platforms have independent privacy policies and terms of service, which can affect the privacy and confidentiality that can be maintained on behalf of a client (Lustgarten, 2015). Additionally, various actors can interfere with the secure transmission and use of technology-based services (e.g, governmental or organizational actors; Lustgarten & Colbow, 2017). This presentation will provide attendees with information about what services are currently used by professionals, how threat actors might take advantage of vulnerability, and how to better protect data.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will understand what technology is currently used in the provision of therapy and research.
  • Attendees will develop competence for threats to technology use.
  • Attendees will learn to employ strategies to protect clients and participants.