The Inclusion of Disability in the Diversity Curriculum in the Age of Reparative Justice and Liberation Psychology

$10.00

Presenter:  Dr. Julie L. Williams is a Board-Certified Rehabilitation Psychologist and Professor at the School of Professional Psychology at Wright State University. She has expertise in disability justice work and reparative intervention strategies for the disability community.  Dr. Williams identifies as a clinician, activist and liberation psychologist.

Webinar Summary: The American Psychological Association (2017) continues to mandate the profession to promote cultural humility and awareness and to apply concepts of intersectionality and reparative justice in teaching and practice. This webinar will highlight disability as a socially constructed experience that parallels encounters of oppression and discrimination of minority groups and will discuss sociopolitical forces of oppression and discrimination that are specific to those with disabilities. The webinar will highlight the importance of intersectionality, treating the person as a whole, and bringing visibility to those who have not been visible in the disability community (e.g., LGBTQ, Black, ethnically diverse). Finally, this webinar will offer teaching and practice strategies to address ways by which the presence of disability has been absent. This will be accomplished by drawing on contemporary disability justice movements, as well as reparative justice and liberation psychology. Finally, this webinar will provide strategies by which to reduce discrimination and promote cultural awareness.

Learning Objectives:

  • List the predominant historical disability models and describe the impact of these models on the exclusion of disability from diversity curriculum in psychology.
  • Recognize the intersectionality of ableism and other oppressed identities.
  • Recite 3 corrective teaching strategies utilizing liberation theory and reparative justice concepts that can be taken to include disability in diversity curriculum.

Description

Presenter:  Dr. Julie L. Williams is a Board-Certified Rehabilitation Psychologist and Professor at the School of Professional Psychology at Wright State University. She has expertise in disability justice work and reparative intervention strategies for the disability community.  Dr. Williams identifies as a clinician, activist and liberation psychologist.

 

Webinar Summary: The American Psychological Association (2017) continues to mandate the profession to promote cultural humility and awareness and to apply concepts of intersectionality and reparative justice in teaching and practice. This webinar will highlight disability as a socially constructed experience that parallels encounters of oppression and discrimination of minority groups and will discuss sociopolitical forces of oppression and discrimination that are specific to those with disabilities. The webinar will highlight the importance of intersectionality, treating the person as a whole, and bringing visibility to those who have not been visible in the disability community (e.g., LGBTQ, Black, ethnically diverse). Finally, this webinar will offer teaching and practice strategies to address ways by which the presence of disability has been absent. This will be accomplished by drawing on contemporary disability justice movements, as well as reparative justice and liberation psychology. Finally, this webinar will provide strategies by which to reduce discrimination and promote cultural awareness.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • List the predominant historical disability models and describe the impact of these models on the exclusion of disability from diversity curriculum in psychology.
  • Recognize the intersectionality of ableism and other oppressed identities.
  • Recite 3 corrective teaching strategies utilizing liberation theory and reparative justice concepts that can be taken to include disability in diversity curriculum.