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Why Gender Matters in the Study and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders

This SCP Blog by Dr. Kathryn McHugh discusses a recent article published in Clinical Psychology Review about why gender matters in the study and treatment of substance use disorders. For many years, knowledge on the nature and treatment of substance use disorders was based on research conducted in males. The vast majority of research on substance use in women has …

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The Promise of Transdiagnostic Treatments for Anxiety Disorders

This SCP blog piece by Drs. David Barlow and Matthew Gallagher discusses a new article in JAMA Psychiatry pertaining to the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders. Significant progress has been made in recent decades in identifying effective psychosocial treatments for anxiety and mood disorders. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) treatment protocols for specific disorders such as panic disorder are …

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A Survivor’s guide to Clinical Supervision

This student blog piece was written and submitted by Amanda R. Simmons, M.A., SCP, Section 10 Campus Representative, University of Denver In finishing up my second year of the doctoral program at the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Professional Psychology, I reflected on the number of times I heard that the success of supervision depends on the “fit” between …

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Assertiveness Training: A Forgotten Evidence-Based Treatment

This SCP Blog post by Brittany Speed, Brandon Goldstein, and Dr. Marvin Goldfried discuss their recent publication in CP:SP addressing the role of assertiveness training in clinical psychology. Although psychotherapy has been in existence for over a century, the field has struggled to build upon research findings with consistent, accumulating evidence. One reason for this problem may be because we …

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Reflective Practices for Graduate Students

This SCP Student blog post written by Lia Smith highlights some excellent pointers for graduate students in psychology. Many of us enter graduate school with the assumption that we are about to embark on a unique period of heavy workloads and extreme stress. We are so excited for the opportunity to pursue our long sought-after goals that we’re prepared to …

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Treatment Considerations for Undocumented Patients

This SCP Blog is written by David Talavera, a Clinical Psychology PhD candidate at the University of Houston who is completing his predoctoral internship at Harvard Medical School/Cambridge Health Alliance. Let’s try a little exercise: Pretend you’re a patient waiting for your therapist for the first time. You’re in the waiting room. It’s quiet. You hear the air-conditioning humming. You …

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Clinical Considerations When Clients Have Children

This SCP blog by Zalewski, Goodman, Cole, and McLaughlin corresponds with a new Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice article titled, “Clinical Considerations when Treating Adults who are Parents.” Flight attendants always instruct passengers to secure their own oxygen masks before assisting others. This simple practice reflects that parents can best help their children after ensuring their own well-being.  This basic …

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Can prisoners with mental health problems benefit from psychological therapy? Yes, but health and justice need to be closer friends.

This SCP blog by Karen Slade, Psy.D. correspondents with a new article in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology titled, “Outcomes of Psychological Therapies for Prisoners with Mental Health Problems: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. All over the world, people held in our jails and prisons experience far greater levels of mental illness than the general population including PTSD, major …

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Navigating Supervision: Ten Tips for Psychology Graduate Students

by Jessica Cowan, SCP/ Section 10 Campus Representative For many of us, when we begin our graduate-program work the concept of clinical supervision is a mysterious concept. We hear about supervision experiences from students further along in their training, and it’s perhaps conceptually and briefly addressed in initial coursework, but other than knowing that we will one day be assigned …

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What makes mental illness stigma so hard to change (and also to study)?

by Ava T. Casados about her recently published article in Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice Society holds negative attitudes about mental illness, and these attitudes form a stigma that impacts many individuals on both interpersonal levels (e.g., blaming, name-calling) and institutional levels (e.g., employment discrimination). The stigma experienced because of one’s mental illness can in turn exacerbate psychological symptoms and …